Cocktail Experiments with the Owl’s Brew

owl's brew tea-based cocktail mixer the classic coco-lada

As this blog makes evident, my drink of choice is whisky. It’s what I save up for, what I enjoy sharing with others, what I savor at the end of the day. But I like drinking other stuff too: beer while I’m cooking, a bottle of wine for lingering over a meal, and cocktails—glorious cocktails!—when a creative mood strikes or when I hit up a particularly great bar.

Sometimes I’m not in a creative mood and I still want a cocktail. In those situations, I usually turn to trusty stand-bys, like a Botanist gin and tonic or rum and pineapple juice. But even my tried-and-true favorites occasionally get old and, lacking the energy or some special ingredient needed to create a more exciting drink, I give up and regretfully settle for whatever’s closest at hand, mixed or not.

Now I have another option for staving off cocktail burnout: the Owl’s Brew, tea-based cocktail mixers that suit a variety of booze and just about any effort level. If you’re feeling lazy or uninspired, mix two parts of the Owl’s Brew to one part of your chosen hooch. If you’d rather play around, use the Brew as you would any non-alcoholic juice or flavored liquid and make it one component of a more complex recipe.

If you’re not normally a tea-drinker, don’t let that turn you off. The tea taste is pretty subtle and, besides that, the Owl’s Brew blends spices, herbs, and fruit with agave, making the end result a well-balanced mixer that doesn’t overwhelm with sweetness or fake flavors. Frankly, I’d drink this by itself at breakfast or for a post-workout energy boost, because it’s really tasty. And, unlike a lot of other pre-made mixers, it’s decidedly more wholesome with no high fructose corn syrup or scary dyes.

Brew and Basil cocktail gin the owl's brew the classic tea-based cocktail mixer

I tried two of the three current Owl’s Brew varieties: the Classic and the Coco-Lada. Earthy, slightly tart and delightfully easy to drink, the Classic worked well in every drink I concocted, and I was disappointed to blow through the bottle quickly. The Coco-Lada proved a little more challenging for me since coconut water features prominently as one ingredient. Despite the prevailing trend, I really can’t stand coconut water, so I struggled to come up with a recipe that complemented the Coco-Lada’s flavor profile but didn’t make my nose wrinkle. Fortunately, the other ingredients (pineapple, ginger, chai spices) balanced out the coconut water and supported vigorous experimentation.

As I tried various combinations, I found that—unsurprisingly—herbs and spices worked really well with these mixers. Even the first recipe, composed of only the Owl’s Brew and booze, features an herbal note in the vodka thanks to its delicate grass infusion. It would make sense to try this with Becherovka, Chartreuse, in a Pimm’s Cup, or in combination with any herbal liqueur you like.

If you enjoy a cocktail of an evening but don’t consider yourself much of a mixologist, keeping a bottle of the Owl’s Brew on hand is one way to ensure you never have to resort to desperate measures. And if you like more complicated beverages, blending a little here or there can provide depth and complexity without a lot of extraneous ingredients. I could see this featuring in a large-scale punch or as part of a brunch cocktail. You could even throw it in your green juice sans alcohol if you need a little extra sumpin-sumpin. Even if you’re dubious, grab a small bottle and give it a try, if for no other reason than it’s different, and tasty, and you might be surprised at how much you like it.

The Bison’s Brew
1.5 oz Zubrowka Bison Grass vodka
3 oz The Classic
Grapefruit twist

Shake or stir vodka and Owl’s Brew with ice. Serve in a rocks glass with a twist of grapefruit. 

Brew & Basil
1.5 oz London dry gin, such as Tanqueray
3 oz The Classic
1/4 oz fresh lime juice
2 sprigs sweet basil

Shake gin, Owl’s Brew, lime juice, and one sprig of basil vigorously with ice. Strain into a cocktail or rocks glass and garnish with the remaining sprig of basil.

Maple-Lada
1.5 oz white rum
3 oz Coco-Lada
1/2 oz fresh lime juice
1/2-3/4 tsp maple syrup
2 pieces of star anise

Shake rum, Coco-Lada, lime juice, maple syrup, and one piece of star anise with ice; strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with remaining star anise.

Spend this Holiday Season at the #CaptainsTable

pork tenderloin apple sweet potato brussels sprout Captain Morgan glaze Hugh Acheson

This Thursday, millions of Americans will spend hours peeling potatoes, whipping cream, basting turkeys, rolling dough, and whisking gravy to prepare and share a meal with loved ones. They’ll go to great lengths to over-feed guests, impress the in-laws, and relish copious leftovers. Thanksgiving has become for many the only day each year that we make a great effort to prepare an elaborate feast—and to enjoy it with gratitude.

But millions of other Americans—the 14.7 million households who at some point have struggled to put food on the table—will find their Thanksgiving spreads a little more sparse. And they won’t have enough leftovers to enjoy for days afterward—many won’t have enough food to see out the week. Even with government assistance and the generosity of soup kitchens and food pantries, some of our neighbors still worry about where their next meal will come from.

hunger charity celebrity chef Hugh Acheson Captain Morgan rum

The non-profit organization WhyHunger aims to end poverty and hunger (not just in the US, but everywhere) “by connecting people to nutritious, affordable food and by supporting grassroots solutions that inspire self-reliance and community empowerment.” Their multi-faceted work encompasses a variety of efforts to ensure all people have access to nutritious food. At the moment, they’re partnering with Captain Morgan (yes, of the spiced rum) and chef Hugh Acheson (you know him from Top Chef) to raise funds throughout the holiday season. Until February 2014, any tweet, Instagram, or Pinterest post with the hashtag #CaptainsTable garners a $1 donation to WhyHunger from Captain Morgan.

Photo courtesy of Taylor Strategy

Cape Corsair—recipe below
Photo courtesy of Taylor Strategy

A recent press launch for the campaign featured seasonal Captain Morgan cocktails and boozy bites—perfect for getting into the Thanksgiving mood and the spirit of the campaign. As I enjoyed Acheson’s charcuterie and an excellent cranberry cocktail, I was fully aware of the privileged position I occupy—not just at a fun party, but every day. I have no worries about being able to eat, and eat well. Obviously, I wouldn’t be writing this blog if that were the case.

But I have lived in so-called “food deserts” and neighborhoods where the majority of the residents need government assistance. I’ve shopped at the grocery stores where most food comes in cans or boxes and where junk food is far cheaper than fresh. Eating well with those limited resources is possible, sure, but it sucks. You eat the same things over and over because there’s never any variety at the store. Plus, preparing meals from whole foods takes a lot longer than reheating a frozen pizza, and when you work two jobs, time is short. And, frankly, junk food tastes better than what a lot of people—with limited cooking skills, resources, and time—are able to prepare.

So I fully support Chef Acheson and Captain Morgan in their campaign for WhyHunger. And even though I hope they’d donate the money whether or not people use the hashtag #CaptainsTable, I’ll set my usual cynicism aside and join in. It’s Thanksgiving time—and I have so much, and so much for which to be thankful.

To learn more about WhyHunger and issues of food insecurity, visit whyhunger.org. For every #CaptainsTable hashtag on Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest, Captain Morgan will donate $1 to the charity.

Cape Corsair
Recipe courtesy of Captain Morgan

Ingredients:
12 fresh whole cranberries
1 inch piece fresh ginger, thinly sliced
½ oz. simple syrup
2 dashes orange Bitters
1 ¼ oz. Captain Morgan® Black Spiced Rum
1 oz. cranberry juice
½ oz. lime juice
lime peel to garnish

Directions:
In mixing glass, muddle the cranberries, ginger, and simple syrup. Add the bitters and Captain Morgan® Black Spiced Rum, cranberry and lime juices and shake with ice. Pour into a double old-fashioned glass, ice and all, smash style. Garnish with an expressed lime peel.

‘Cueing Up Summer

the difibulators, a bluegrass band from nyc

Is there anything better than barbecue, bluegrass, and good booze to get you excited about summertime? Maybe ice cream. And cornhole. And great company to share in these marvelous things.

bobwhite lunch and supper counter nyc fried chicken potato salad pimento cheese sandwich

What’s better than fried chicken? Cold fried chicken. (Seriously.)

Last week, I got all that and more at Tasting Table‘s ‘Cue Up Summer party. Yes, it’s already late July. But after an intensely oppressive heat wave, I think we all needed a reason to get excited about summer again. With great food by local purveyors, twangtastic bluegrass from the Difibulators, and unlimited booze, it perfectly renewed my love of the season’s simple pleasures. (And it didn’t hurt that the day itself was unseasonably cool!)

Delaney Barbecue, brisket and ribs.

Serving up brisket and two kinds of ribs, and you still want more.

It all went down in the Elizabeth Street Garden which, under normal circumstances, is lovely enough with its antique statuary and rampant greenery. This evening, marquees strung with fairy lights sheltered tables laden with picnic pleasures—cold fried chicken, potato salad, and pimento cheese sandwiches from Bobwhite Lunch & Supper Counter; brisket, pork AND beef ribs, and fixins from Delaney Barbecue; some guilt-free gazpacho and veggies topped with Tabasco Buffalo Sauce; and amazing desserts—cookies by Mah-ze-Dahr Bakery; Imperial Woodpecker sno-balls; and massive ice cream sandwiches by Melt Bakery.

Melt ice cream sandwich s'most

There’s a marshmallow hiding in that ice cream sandwich.

And what would an outdoor summer party be without bottomless booze? Guests had their choice of Santa Margherita wines, Goose Island beers, and cocktails made with Monkey Shoulder and Hendrick’s Gin. I’m a big fan of both of the latter and stuck to those. The Hendrick’s lemonade suited my unusual preference for having lemon with Hendrick’s (and only with Hendrick’s—with other gins, it’s always lime), and the Summer Jam, mixing Monkey Shoulder with strawberry jam and lemon juice, was everything a July whisky cocktail should be—cool, slightly sweet, and far too easy to drink. Check out the recipe below.

Joshua Feldman, the Coopered Tot and whisky aficionado

Josh fits right in with the mood lighting.

My buddy Josh, of the Coopered Tot and Morgan Library whisky fame, along with some new friends, ensured that the company was as good as the comestibles. Thanks to Nick of Exposure USA for hosting with aplomb and Freddy of William Grant & Sons for sharing his extensive boozey knowledge. Summer might be half-gone already, but I plan to carry on with the outdoor eating, drinking, and merry-making, getting all I can out of the few weeks we have left.

Summer Jam
1 1/4 parts Monkey Shoulder Whisky
1/2 part fresh lemon juice
1 dollop of strawberry jam
Dash of sugar to taste
Splash of seltzer

Add all ingredients except seltzer to a shaker. Shake well. Strain into a glass with ice and top with a splash of seltzer.